Saudi Female Students’ Perceptions of Leadership: An Overview

Saudi Female Students’ Perceptions of Leadership: An Overview

Very few researches have highlighted Arab women leadership perceptions. The aim of this research study is to investigate Saudi female university students’ perceptions of leadership. In order to address the aim of this study, data were collected from 50 female students at the University of Dammam who were attending various colleges, namely the College of Science, the College of Education, and the College of Arts. The data-gathering process included asking a random sample of students to complete a questionnaire and administering it to them at the end of the semester. The review of the results of this research showed that there are statistically significant differences in attitudes among female students towards leadership. Keywords: Higher education in Saudi Arabia, Leadership in Saudi Arabia, Female students’ education in Saudi Arabia.

 

The aim of this research study is to gain insight into Saudi female university students’ perceptions of leadership. Saudi Arabia is the wealthiest country in the Middle East and has directed its full attention a great deal of its attention in recent years to investing in human capital. Recent researches, in some leadership journals, like Advancing Women in Leadership Journal, have focused on females and leadership and on ways in which societies can be reshaped in order to achieve a sustainable, inclusive and durable future. Despite significant advances in education and professional achievement, women remain underrepresented in leadership positions in politics, education, communities and business around the globe. In many countries, policy-makers have responded by introducing gender quotas in politics and, increasingly, many have expressed an interest in requiring gender quotas for organizations (Shura Council Law, Royal Decree no. A/91). According to Pande and Ford (2011), while female suffrage did not exist in 1890, women had obtained the right to vote in 96 percent of the countries in the world by 1994. The few remaining countries have also moved toward implementing female suffrage in recent years (DuBois, 1998). For instance, women obtained the right to vote in Oman in 2003, in Kuwait in 2005, and in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates in 2006 (Kelly, 2009). See full publication

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